Social Studies

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SS200 Contemporary US History
10
Standard
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Contemporary US History is a journey through the history of the United States starting at World War II and ending in modern day America. The course will cover such topics as the causes/effects of conflict throughout the 2nd half of the 20th century, the social changes that took place during this time, as well as economic developments within the United States and those developments on the World.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources and evaluate their intent and information
  • Determine the key ideas in primary and secondary sources and how their interpretations have changed over time
  • Evaluate the different points of view of historical events
  • Infuse technology into course studies to produce writing products while determining the reliability of those sources and interpretations
  • Identify the major events that shaped the course of American history from 1945 to today

If you take this course, you must also take SS200-S2 – Contemporary US History S2

SS205 Global Studies
9
Standard
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Offered to 9th Grade ONLY. The objectives of this course are to create and develop informed world citizens who see meaning in the arrangement of people and things across the Earth’s surface; who appreciate the relationships between people, places and environments; who use geographic skills; and who apply geographic perspectives to life situations. We will study various world cultures in a regional manner in effort to better understand the histories of various civilizations. The mission of Global Studies is to equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary not only to better understand various world cultures and events, but to prepare students to compete and thrive in our ever diverse and increasingly interdependent world.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources and evaluate their intent and information
  • Create and develop informed world citizens and see meaning in the arrangement of people and things across the Earth’s surface
  • Identify relationships between people, places and environments and their effects on history
  • Prepare students to compete and thrive in our ever diverse and increasingly interdependent world

If you take this course, you must also take SS205-S2 – Global Studies S2

SS300 Civics
11
Standard
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. The purpose of the course is to teach students about the institutions of government that exist in the United States. Students would explore the role of citizen in a democracy. Additionally, students would also be exposed to the economic institutions and forces that exist in the world. The course will be aligned to national economic and civics standards and will prepare students for the mandated citizenship test required for graduation.

Outcomes:

  • Students explore principles, features and practices that characterize democracy and capitalism in the United States
  • Explore how democracy and capitalism in the US functions compared to other systems of government
  • Students explore how and why civic and political rights, government policies, and national identity have changed over time in the United States
  • Students evaluate America’s pluralist society cohesive, democratic community
  • Promote civic action using economic and political theory learned from the course
  • Analyze economic and political data

If you take this course, you must also take SS300-S2 – Civics

SS301 European History to 1500
11, 12
Standard
0.5

Students will be challenged to discover the foundations of Western Civilizations. Units of study will include Greek/Roman Civilizations, rise of nation states, and the impact of religion on society.

Outcomes:

  • Acquire knowledge of basic events and movements in Ancient and Medieval European History
  • Understand the patterns and connections of historical events to past eras
  • Express their historical understanding through clear, coherent, and organized written communication
  • Identify main ideas, analyze supporting details, and evaluate inferences within discipline specific readings
  • Use appropriate technology to gather, analyze, apply, and synthesize historical data and information
  • Read primary source historical documents to form logical inferences about historical events or movements and discern between varying points of view
SS302 Mod Euro Hist 1500 to Present
11, 12
Standard
0.5

Students will explore the development of European society and investigate and analyze the effect European expansion had on the world. Units will include the age of exploration, world colonization, industrialization, development of modern European ideology, and global conflict.

Outcomes:

  • Acquire knowledge of basic events and movements in modern European History (up to the 20th Century)
  • Understand the patterns and connections of historical events to past eras
  • Express historical understanding through clear, coherent, and organized written communication
  • Identify main ideas, analyze supporting details, and evaluate inferences within discipline specific readings
  • Use appropriate technology to gather, analyze, apply, and synthesize historical data and information
  • Read primary source historical documents to form logical inferences about historical events or movements and discern between varying points of view
SS503 20th Century World History
11, 12
Standard
0.5

Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of local, national, and international events in today’s world as well as the background information that lead to these events. This course will analyze major events in 20th Century World History including World Wars I and II, The Cold War, Middle Eastern conflict, revolutions of the 20th century as well as current events.

Outcomes:

  • Acquire knowledge of basic events and movements in World History over last the century
  • Understand the patterns and connections of historical events to past eras
  • Express historical understanding through clear, coherent, and organized written communication
  • Identify main ideas, analyze supporting details, and evaluate inferences within discipline specific readings
  • Use appropriate technology to gather, analyze, apply, and synthesize historical data and information
  • Read primary source historical documents to form logical inferences about historical events or movements and discern between varying points of view
SS602 American Diversity
11, 12
Standard
0.5

The purpose of this course is to better understand oneself and recognize how feelings, ideas, and beliefs interact with the ideas and beliefs of other individuals and groups. The course will examine the many aspects of American society including, but not limited to culture, ethnicity, race, religion, and gender issues. The exploration of the interrelationship of these issues will help create a more accurate picture of modern America.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze their beliefs and cultural influences that make them who they are
  • Reflect on historical events that shape our diverse American culture
  • Identify skills that are needed to work effectively in groups and the impact culture may have on those skills
  • Engage in dialogue and reflection about a variety of cultures, viewpoints, and philosophies
  • Identify and address examples of bias, stereotypes, and discrimination in modern American society
  • Develop a personal plan based on an attitude of tolerance and understanding of people’s cultural differences
SS632 Sociology
11, 12
Standard
0.5

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles and theories of sociology and their relationship to groups in societies of our world. Students will examine theories related to sociology, sociological research, social structures, societies of the world, deviance, social inequality, social institutions, and social change.

Outcomes:

  • Understanding of scientific methodology and problem solving techniques related to sociology
  • Understand how groups and institutions can influence people, events and cultures in current and historical settings
  • Evaluate conflict resolution between groups and cultures around the world
  • Identify skills that are needed to work effectively in groups and the impact culture may have on those skills
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research
SS661 Psychology
11, 12
Standard
0.5

The purpose of this course is to introduce and explore the basic principles and theories of psychology. Units will include history/research in psychology, brain structure/function, sensation/perception, memory, motivation/emotion, learning, cognition, language, intelligence, individual differences, social/cultural behavior, personality, personality assessment, psychological disorders, treatment of psychological disorders, states of consciousness, sleep/dreams, and developmental psychology.

Outcomes:

  • Understanding of scientific methodology and problem solving techniques related to psychology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of psychological concepts, perspectives, theories, terminology and their interconnectedness
  • Demonstrate uses of psychological concepts in everyday life
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research
SS680 AP Human Geography
9, 10, 11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both S1 and S2. The purpose of AP Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • To introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface
  • To learn about and employ the methods of geographers, especially including observation, mapmaking, data gathering and reporting, and technical writing
  • To employ spatial concepts, geographic vocabulary, and landscape interpretation to a variety of locations and situations around the globe and in local areas
  • To develop a geographic perspective with which to view the landscape and understand current events
  • Students will be tested throughout the year via multiple-choice, Short-Answer Questions, Long Essays, and Document Based Question essays to prepare them for the A.P. test in May.-All AP Human Geography

If you take this course, you must also take SS680-S2 – AP Human Geography S2

SS700 AP Government & Politics
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program Students will acquire an analytic perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States politics. This course has been designed to help students successfully complete the National College Board Advanced Placement Government and Politics exam (administered in May) which may allow students to earn college credit. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to US government and politics
  • Understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences – including political behavior, principles used to explain or justify various government structures and procedures, and the political effects of these structures and procedures
  • Analyze and interpret basic data relevant to US government and politics including data presented in charts, tables, and other formats
  • Critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately, and develop their connections across the curriculum

Contemporary US History
or
AP US History

If you take this course, you must also take SS700-S2 – AP Government & Politics S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History
SS710 AP European History
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Accelerated Course College Advanced Program offered in alternate years, this course will be offered in the 2020-2021 school year. The students will analyze basic themes of Modern European Society including intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history. The AP outline will be used as a guide for the course. Units deal with the philosophy and the growth of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in European society. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze the development and evolution of modern European society by exploring three themes: cultural and intellectual history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history
  • Express historical understanding through an essay with a well-developed thesis, relevant topic sentences, supported with specific historical information, and a conclusion
  • Read primary source historical documents to form logical inferences about historical events or movements and discern between varying points of view
  • Use appropriate technology to gather, analyze, apply, and synthesize historical data and information
  • Acquire knowledge of basic events and movements in modern European society

SS200-S1- Contemporary US History S1 AND SS200-S2 – Contemporary US History S2
or
SS720-S1 – AP US History S1 AND SS720-S2 – AP US History S2

If you take this course, you must also take SS710-S2 AP European History S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History before taking AP European History
SS720 AP US History
10, 11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program This course emphasizes analytical skills, critical thinking, reading, and writing when dealing with the factual knowledge necessary to critically analyze the issues within U.S. History. The A.P outline will be used as a guide for the course. Units include Colonial History, the Revolution and Early Republic, Nationalism and Sectionalism, Civil War and Reconstruction, Growth of Industrialization and Urbanization, World War I and America’s emergence as a world power, Depression and New Deal, World War II, Cold War America, and the Modern U.S. This course is designed to facilitate successful completion of the A.P.U.S. History exam in the spring for potential earning of college credit. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze historical facts and interpretations of historians
  • Develop critical analysis skills to clearly communicate ideas in written form
  • Compare and contrast political, geographic, economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual institutions, structures, and processes over time and between different groups within American society
  • Analyze the contributions and effects of past events to the contemporary world
  • Evaluate the diversity of the American populace and subsequent relationships among different groups based on race, class, ethnicity, and gender in American history
  • Identify and evaluate the diverse individual and collective art-based, popular culture expressions
  • Examine trends in trade, commerce, and technology over time
  • Evaluate the effects of capitalist development, labor unions, and consumerism on economic development
  • Examine how American identity is influenced by political, geographic, economic, cultural, and familial institutions
  • Compare and contrast American foreign policy over time
  • Assess the role of American military action from the pre-colonial period to our current time and its impact on foreign policy, politics, the economy, and society

Global Studies
or
AP Human Geography

If you take this course, you must also take SS720-S2 – AP US History S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Global Studies or AP Human Geography before taking AP US History
SS730 AP Psychology
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. AP Psychology provides a college level introduction to psychology at the secondary level. This course stresses critical thinking, reading, and writing within the context of scientific methodology and questioning. Students are introduced to the major topical areas of psychology by studying core concepts and theories and by learning the basic skills of psychological research. This course has been designed to help students successfully complete the National College Board Advanced Placement Psychology exam, administered in May, which may allow students to earn college credit. The course outline complied by the College Board will be used as a guide for the units taught in class. This course will examine research methods, human psychological and biological development, sensation/perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, developmental psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders, stress, and social psychology. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Develop scientific attitudes and skills including critical thinking, problem solving and an understanding of scientific methodology related to psychology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of psychological concepts, perspectives, theories, terminology and their interconnectedness
  • Develop methods to use psychological knowledge in everyday life
  • Produce clear and coherent writing to answer Free Response Questions
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research

Contemporary US History
or
AP US History

If you take this course, you must also take SS730-S2 – AP Psychology S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History before taking AP Psychology