Articulated Credits



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AR750 AP Studio Art: Draw/Design
12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. potential college credit This course is geared toward for the serious art student who is considering a post-secondary degree in the visual arts, a career as a fine artist, an art educator, or who wants the challenge of a rigorous art program that allows the student to pursue their individual artistic vision. This course offers students the potential to receive college credit by submitting a portfolio for review by the College Board. If the student chooses not to submit a portfolio they will still receive advanced credit.
The course will address three major concerns that are constants in art production:

  1. a sense of quality in student work
  2. student concentration on a particular visual interest or problem
  3. student need for breadth of experience in formal, technical, and expressive means.

Students signing up for this course are expected to take the AP examination.

Outcomes:
Knowledge:

  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the requirements of the AP Art portfolio
  • Understand, utilize, and identify the elements and principles of design
  • Identify and discuss major topics in art history; ancient to modern

Technique:

  • Create the Breadth portion of the portfolio; 12 pieces of artwork that exhibit strong skill and technique within a broad range of subject matter, technique and media
  • Create the Concentration portion of the portfolio; A series of 9-12 pieces of artwork that shows the investigation of a theme or problem proposed by each individual student
  • Demonstrate the ability to consistently create strong work with a high level of craftsmanship inherently integrating the elements and principles of design

Analysis:

  • Critically analyze, evaluate and compare personal work with the work of other in a written format as well as participating in regular oral group critiques

Two studio level courses

If you take this course, you must also take AR750-S2 – AP Studio Art: Draw/Design S2

Students will need a 11 x 14 sketchbook.
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Gateway Technical College Students will discover what business is, does, and how it impacts everyday living. Students will develop characteristics, habits and practices that will make effective and forceful workers. The class is broken into two phases: basic economics and personal economics [taxes, careers, marketing, and budgeting]. Basic economics is a study of economic systems, the various ways that nations produce goods and services to meet the wants and needs of people. Economic problems that face businesses will be reviewed, including inflation, recession, depression, and international trade. Personal economics is a study of economic problems faced in the enterprise systems. Topics include: careers, good buying, types of taxes, and simple investments.

Outcomes:

  • Compare and evaluate the different types of economic systems within our global economy
  • Differentiate between business structures and illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of each
  • Describe the impact of consumer motives on purchasing choices
  • Evaluate sources of and cost of credit
  • Create an effective marketing plan and publicity campaign
  • Analyze career options and opportunities within the world of business

If you take this course, you must also take BE112-S2 – Business Concepts S2

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

Strong keyboarding skills are critical for the jobs of the future. Students will develop accurate “”touch”” keyboarding skills and work at increasing their typing speed throughout the first semester. During the second half of the course, students will learn skills that include producing unbound reports with page numbers, quotations, numbered lists, references, and title pages. In addition, students will produce business letters and learn basic word processing functions.

Outcomes:

  • Improve keyboarding techniques
  • Increase keyboarding speed and accuracy
  • Key and format letters, memos, reports, outlines and tables
  • Develop or update a resume
  • Complete a job application form
  • Summarize issues with Internet safety
Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

This course will prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification and the IC3 certification-Key Application module. This course provides students the opportunity to learn the Microsoft Office Suite of Programs. This is a valuable class for the college-bound students as well as the student interested in the business field. The Word unit will include use of spellchecker, format painter, styles, columns, bulleted and numbered lists, tables, clip art, auto shapes, page formatting, templates, macros, and table of contents. The Excel unit will focus on designing and creating spreadsheets using formulas and functions to solve business problems and project future trends through charting. The PowerPoint unit will allow students to prepare quality presentations using animation, clip art and movie clips. Students will also learn to create and maintain databases through Access.

Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate proficiency of common features in several application software programs
  • Analyze, organize and interpret data to find solutions using various software programs
  • Design, create and produce original works and innovative presentations
  • Incorporate media and technology to create and communicate information
  • Discover and differentiate the integration features of a software package by importing, exporting, and merging data
Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
11, 12
Standard
0.5

Entrepreneurship is the art of owning and operating your own business. In this class, students will explore and assess their entrepreneurial attitudes and ability, learn how to assess business competition, and create a business plan. Students will learn from entrepreneurs who will speak in class, projects, videos, traditional assignments, and from the semester project of developing their own business plan. This class will also utilize the new FAB Lab in various course projects.

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from the University of Iowa.
10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

Laws are a part of everyday life. Explore your legal rights and responsibilities. Discover how law relates to you and to business; its history, its natures and types, and its place in society. Areas of study include how laws were formed, procedures in civil and criminal cases, making contacts, terminating contracts, responsibilities of minors, being a consumer, purchasing power, purchasing insurance, and personal and real property rights. Gain knowledge of legal problems and develop the ways to analyze, evaluate, and resolve legal disputes.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze legal terminology, concepts, and precedence’s and their impact both on personal life and business situations
  • Differentiate between the jurisdictions of various court systems and describe civil and criminal court procedures
  • Analyze the elements of a contract to determine if a valid contract exists
  • Summarize the legal rights of citizens and identify corresponding responsibilities of citizens
  • Explain federal and state laws that afford consumer protection
Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
11, 12
College Credit
0.5

Take this course to learn why Apple, ESPN, Twitter, Google, and Nike are considered successful marketers. Students find out what it takes to market a product or service in today’s fast-paced business environment. They learn the fundamentals of marketing using real-world business examples. They learn about buyer behavior, marketing research principles, demand analysis, distribution, pricing, and product management.
This course helps students understand the scope of marketing and the importance of marketing in our economy. Changes and trends in the consumer goods market of the United States and foreign markets are covered. Consumer behavior is examined as well as retailing and wholesaling structures.

Accounting I

If you take this course, you must also take BE430-S2 – College Accounting S2

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
11, 12
Accelerated, College Credit
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2 Accounting uses an integrated approach to teach accounting. Students first learn how businesses plan for and evaluate their operating, financing and investing decisions and study how accounting systems gather and provide data to internal and external decision makers. This year-long course will include all of the learning targets of a traditional college level financial accounting course, plus those from a managerial accounting course. Topics include an introduction to accounting, accounting information systems, time value of money, and accounting for merchandising firms, sales and receivables, fixed assets, debt and equity. Other topics include statement of cash flows, financial ratios, cost-volume profit analysis and variance analysis.

Outcomes:

  • Research events of unethical accountancy activities and possible consequences to individuals and the economy
  • Complete all steps of the accounting cycle
  • Perform accounting procedures using spreadsheet software
  • Analyze accounting concepts in inventory
  • Record depreciation of plant assets
  • Compute depletion and journal entry for depletion
  • Perform notes payable and notes receivable activities
  • Prepare payroll entries
  • Implement accounting for partnerships and for corporations
  • Analyze financial data

BE400-S1 – Accounting I S1 AND BE400-S2 – Accounting I S2

If you take this course, you must also take BE432-S2 – College Accounting TC S2

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
11, 12
College Credit, Standard
1

Payroll and Income Tax Accounting is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Students will acquire basic knowledge in processing payroll and preparing income tax returns. Students will be working with tax tables and forms and learn how to determine gross and net earnings of an employee. Deductions for social security, Medicare, federal and state income taxes will be computed. Students will also be able to determine the employer’s liability for payroll taxes including unemployment and workers’ compensation premiums. Electronic software will be utilized to input and run a company’s payroll for one quarter along with manual preparation of federal tax forms. Students will prepare personal and state income tax returns and have the opportunity to complete income tax returns for the public and gain community service hours through a VITA site.

Outcomes:

  • Describe methods used to determine gross earnings (e.g., piece-rate, hourly, salary, commission, overtime, bonuses)
  • Explain the purposes of withholding’s and other deductions
  • Maintain employee earnings records
  • Generate payroll checks
  • Prepare employer payroll tax returns, sales tax returns, and individual tax returns
  • Learn and improve speed using 10-key calculator
  • Use spreadsheet software to compute calculations

BE400-S1 – Accounting AS S1 AND BE400-S2 – Accounting AS S2

If you take this course, you must also take BE442-S2 – Payroll and Income Tax Accounting S2 TC

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

This course is designed for students to continue with the concepts of web page development. Students will be able to design, produce and post visually appealing web pages that are appropriate and useful; apply appropriate layout and web design techniques to various projects; design and produce effective web pages for individuals, classrooms, schools, and the community; and understand and demonstrate ethics when using the internet. Students will increase their knowledge of Dreamweaver. Students will learn how to edit their images using Fireworks. Students will create animation using Flash and use Javascript with their images and forms.

Outcomes:

  • Create an advanced web site, using Web site design software and/or web programming language
  • Explain or demonstrate publishing, updating, and maintaining a web site
  • Critique a web site according to accepted web site design principles
  • Examine new and emerging trends in web site design
  • Incorporate Search Engine Optimization (SEO) in a web site
  • Identify the basic components of an e-commerce web site

BE242 – Technology Trends

11, 12
College Credit
0.5

The course has five main themes: Planning Personal Finances, Banking and Credit, Investing Financial Resources, Protecting Your Finances, and Business Finance Basics. Students will create a personal budget and learn how to use it. Students will learn how to file a 1040EZ tax form. Students will compare advantages and disadvantages of renting vs. buying a house. Students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of leasing vs. buying an automobile. Students will learn about home, automobile, health, disability, and life insurance. Students will evaluate savings and investment options to meet short-and long-term goals. Students will analyze factors that affect the choice of credit, the cost of credit, and the legal aspects of using credit.

Outcomes:

  • Manage money effectively by developing financial goals and budgets
  • Make responsible consumer decisions using available resources
  • Assess advantages and disadvantages of credit and debt management
  • Evaluate services provided by financial institutions and maintain related accounts
  • Recommend plans for future financial security by comparing long-term saving and investing options
  • Analyze and balance risk against benefits regarding the role of insurance in financial planning
  • Develop the skills needed to achieve desired financial growth while analyzing the relationship between education, income, career, and desired lifestyle
Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
Accelerated, College Credit
0.5

This introductory course tours the related hospitality fields of hotels, tourism, food service, and attractions with an emphasis on customer service. The course will cover the typical types of establishments found in the US and Wisconsin. Students will be introduced to common job titles, organizational structures, career opportunities, and trends in this field.

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
Accelerated, College Credit
0.5

Introduction to Service in the Hospitality Industry discusses customer service in the hospitality field and how it is the backbone of this industry. Students will learn how to identify good and not so good service as well as how correct service evolved and the reasons for its existence. Students will learn how to deal with upset customers and gain basic dispute management skills.

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit
0.5

Hospitality Management prepares students for the exciting and customer focused hospitality field.  With a focus on customer service, students will explore the tourism, hotel, and foodservice industries within their coursework and internships.  Graduates will have the skills for an entry level position in one of the many local tourism and hospitality establishments including entertainment facilities, tourism attractions, conference centers, hotels, restaurants, and food and beverage operations.

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
FL703 AP Spanish V
12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. AP Spanish Language is intended for students who wish to develop their proficiency in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students who enroll should already have knowledge of the language and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples and should have attained a reasonable proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. This class requires extra time and effort to be successful on the AP Exam. The course is taught entirely in Spanish, following the suggested Advanced Placement curriculum and the Abriendo Paso series. Conversational skills and vocabulary are developed and increased, and the students are expected to use only Spanish in class. All tenses and basic grammar points are reviewed, and there is a study and practice of the subjunctive. Reading and composition activities are based upon selected short stories from Spain and Latin America, including Borges, Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Quiroga, Cisneros, Esquivel, Franco, Unamuno, and selected short novels. Students will develop conversational skills through formal and informal oral presentations. Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Engage in intermediate to advanced conversation: provide and obtain information, express feelings, emotions and personal needs, and exchange opinions
  • Understand and interpret advanced written and spoken language on a variety of topics
  • Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics, demonstrating an advanced level of vocabulary and grammatical structure
  • Demonstrate an advanced understanding on a variety of topics that include novels with Spanish authors. Understand relationships between the practices, perspectives, and products of the Spanish-speaking cultures studied
  • Acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the Spanish language and its cultures
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of Spanish and English
  • Show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the Spanish language both within and beyond the school setting

FL400-S1 – Spanish IV S1 AND FL400-S2 – Spanish IV S2

If you take this course, you must also take FL703-S1 – AP Spanish V S1

LA770 AP English 12
12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2 .Rigorous course and expectations for college bound students. This course provides students with an in-depth study of literature and composition that is comparable to a first-year college English course. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of works of literary merit, the application of literary terms, and composition. Students should plan to take the advanced placement exam at the completion of the year’s work. Materials selected for in-depth study are mature and deemed works of literary merit by The College Board. Students must purchase all reading materials. Summer homework is required.

Outcomes:

  • Read, interpret, evaluate, and critically analyze literary and nonliterary texts that recognize the breadth and depth of literature
  • Demonstrate command of conventions of Standard English grammar, spelling, and usage when writing or speaking
  • Develop AP level vocabulary in order to use phrases and words to improve written and oral communication
  • Participate effectively in small and large group discussion as a way to enhance understanding of a text
  • Write timed, subjective, formal literary analysis essays, focusing on relevant and significant literary elements as well as the universal themes found in literature
  • Write using unity (clarity), coherence, and adequate development
  • Develop effective test-taking strategies for both the multiple choice and written portions of the AP Exam
  • Construct text annotations to aid in comprehension and analysis of texts

LA250-S1 – English 11 S1 AND LA250-S2 – English 11
or
LA400-S1 – English 11 College Prep S1 AND LA400-S2 – English 11 College Prep S2

MA700 AP Calculus AB
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Accelerated College Advanced Program AP Calculus prepares students for more advanced study in mathematics, science and other fields.The course begins with an extensive study of limits and uses this concept to develop differentiation and integration of polynomial, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. An extensive study is conducted in the application areas of science and economics using differentiation and integration. This course will cover the equivalent of the first semester college course. Students enrolling in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement Test for Calculus AB in May. Students are required to have a TI 83 or comparable calculator.

Outcomes:

  • Calculate limits graphically, algebraically, and numerically
  • Find horizontal and vertical asymptotes
  • Analyze continuity of a function
  • Analyze instantaneous and average rate of change
  • Understand the link between derivatives and instantaneous rate of change
  • Use the appropriate method to calculate a derivative
  • Use derivatives to calculate real world rates of change and apply these derivatives appropriately
  • Use derivatives to analyze a function
  • Estimate the area under the curve with finite sums
  • Understand the connection between antiderivatives and integrals
  • Use the appropriate method to calculate an antiderivative
  • Use antiderivatives to calculate volume and other applications

Minimum grade of C- in both MA414-S1 – Pre-Calculus S1 AND MA414-S2 – Pre-Calculus S2

If you take this course, you must also take MA700-S2 – AP Calculus S2

MA701 AP Calculus BC
11, 12
Advanced Placement
0.5

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester (single variable) college calculus courses. Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB.

MA414 – Pre-Calculus with recommendation
or
MA700 – AP Calculus AB

MA710 AP Statistics
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Accelerated College Advanced Program AP Statistics will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The main topics will include exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. All topics will be studied extensively with the use of graphing calculators and computer software. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Ample time will be provided to review exam topics prior to AP Exam. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Outcomes:

  • Construct and interpret distributions with graphs, charts, and tables
  • Describe and compare distributions
  • Calculate numerical summaries by hand and using technology
  • Describe and interpret locations in a distribution (z-scores, percentiles, etc.)
  • Perform Normal distribution calculations including assessing normality
  • Construct and interpret scatterplots
  • Measure, calculate and interpret correlation and a least square regression line
  • Interpret computer output‡ Describe different sampling methods (Stratified, Cluster, etc.)
  • Conduct simple random samples (using a random number table, and technology)
  • Design comparative experiments (completely randomized, randomized block, and matched pairs designs)
  • Use rules of probability to construct venn diagrams, two-way tables and determine probabilities
  • Apply the concept of discrete random variables to many different statistical settings
  • Calculate the expected values of a discrete random variable
  • Describe continuous random variables
  • Compute probabilities involving binomial and geometric random variables
  • Define and distinguish between population distribution, sampling distribution, and the distribution of sample data
  • Estimate a population proportion and mean using confidence intervals
  • Interpret confidence intervals in context
  • Conduct significance tests with populations proportions and means
  • Conduct chi-square goodness of fit tests

Minimum grade of C- in Pre-Calculus or Algebra II

If you take this course, you must also take MA710-S2 – AP Statistics S2

A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required for this course.
MU790 AP Music Theory
10, 11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program The purpose of AP Music Theory is to give serious music students a sound foundation in music fundamentals. This course is intended for preparation for the Advanced Placement test in Music Theory. Students receive training in melodic and harmonic dictation, harmonization, basic piano skills, music history and transposition. Students will experience working with midi-technology using computers. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Arrange a melody for 3 and 4 voice chorus demonstrating command of the rules of voice leading
  • Analyze music for harmonic chord progression and form
  • Realize harmonic chord progression with proper voice leading
  • Compose music for a string quartet and for an ensemble of their choice -Identify aurally intervals, chord quality, and scales
  • Dictate simple melodies with four listening with 70%-100% accuracy
  • Know and apply music history as it pertains to the development and evolution of music theory

If you take this course, you must also take MU790-S2 – AP Music Theory S2

SC452 Principles of Engineering TC
10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
1

Principles of Engineering (POE) is a year long transcripted Project Lead The Way course designed for 10th, 11th or 12th grade students. This survey course exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. This course will fulfill the physical science credit for graduation. Topics include mechanisms, electricity, energy, robotics, statics, materials, and kinematics. They will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. Accelerated credit is available to students upon successful completion of a PLTW portfolio at the end of either or both semesters. An end of the year assessment, which when passed and accompanied with a portfolio, serves as an AP credit at most accredited universities within the United States. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.

MA200-S1 – Geometry S1 AND MA200-S2 – Geometry S2
AND
TE161-S1 – Intro to Engineering Design TC S1 AND TE161-S2 – Intro to Engineering Design TC S2

If you take this course, you must also take SC450-S2 – Principles of Engineering S2

This course will fulfill the physical science credit for graduation. Accelerated credit is available to students upon successful completion of a PLTW portfolio at the end of either or both semesters. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
SC700 AP Biology
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program AP Biology provides students the opportunity to earn college credit for their work in high school biology. The class will build on material from Biology 1, Biology 2, Chemistry, and Anatomy and Physiology. Students are highly encouraged to take Biology 2 and Anatomy and Physiology to prepare for the comprehensive nature of the AP Biology exam. This course will fulfill the biological science credit for graduation. The four big ideas included in AP Biology deal with evolution, homeostasis, life processes, and system interactions. In this course you will complete the required AP Biology labs and course work in preparation for the AP Biology exam. Students enrolling for this advanced placement course are encouraged to take the AP exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Explain how the process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life
  • Describe how biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis
  • Describe how living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes
  • Explain how biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties

SC500-S1 – Chemistry S1 AND SC500-S2 – Chemistry S2

RECOMMENDED:
SC 621-S1 – Biology 2 S1 AND SC 621-S2 – Biology 2 S2

If you take this course, you must also take SC700-S2 – AP Biology S2

This course will fulfill the biological science credit for graduation
SC710 AP Chemistry
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2 Advanced Program Accelerated Course AP Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. AP Chemistry contributes to the development of students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas with clarity and logic. This course will fulfill the physical science credit for graduation. Students enrolling in AP Chemistry are expected to take the AP exam in May.  Offered alternate years, 2019-2020, 2021-2022, 2023-2024.

Outcomes:

  • Use representations and models to communicate scientific phenomena and solve scientific problems
  • Use mathematics appropriately
  • Engage in scientific questioning to extend thinking or to guide investigations within the context of the AP course
  • Plan and implement data collection strategies in relation to a particular scientific question
  • Perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence
  • Work with scientific explanations and theories
  • Connect and relate knowledge across various scales, concepts and representations in and across domains

SC500-S1 – Chemistry S1 AND SC500-S2 – Chemistry S2

If you take this course, you must also take SC710-S2 – AP Chemistry S2

SC720 AP Physics
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2 Advanced Program AP Physics 1 is the equivalent to a first-semester college course. This course will fulfill the physical science credit for graduation. This course includes the study of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), electrostatics, and current electricity. This is a math intensive course; therefore it is highly advised that students have successfully completed Algebra 2 in order to handle the rigor of this course. Due to the rigor of this class, only students who have successfully completed Physics are encouraged to enroll. Students enrolling for this advanced placement course are encouraged to take the AP exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Use representations and models to communicate scientific phenomena and solve scientific problems
  • Use mathematics appropriately
  • Engage in scientific questioning to extend thinking or guide investigations within the context of the AP course
  • Plan and implement data collection strategies in relation to a particular scientific question
  • Perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence
  • Work with scientific explanations
  • Connect and relate knowledge across various scales, concepts, and representations in and across domains

MA300-S1 – Algebra II S1 AND MA300-S2 – Algebra II S2
AND
SC650-S1 – Physics S1 AND SC650-S2 – Physics S2
OR
Consent of instructor

If you take this course, you must also take SC720-S2 – AP Physics S2

It is advised that students complete Pre-Calculus prior to taking this course or at the same time. This course will fulfill the physical science credit for graduation.
SC730 AP Environmental Science
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. This course will fulfill the biological science credit for graduation. Students will be encouraged to take the AP exam in May.  Offered alternate years 2020-2021, 2022-2023, 2024-2025.

Outcomes:

  • Use scientific literature, empirical data, and the scientific method to analyze and address environmental issues in regards to Earth’s interconnected systems as required by the AP exam
  • Explore and evaluate both the negative and positive impacts human populations and new scientific and technological advancements have on ecosystems including the impact on energy and mass
  • Distinguish between sound and “”junk”” science

SC400-S1 – Biology S1 AND SC400-S2 – Biology S2

If you take this course, you must also take SC730-S2 – AP Environmental Science S2

Chemistry or Physics are prerequisites to this course, but may taken concurrently. This course will fulfill the biological science credit for graduation.
SS680 AP Human Geography
9, 10, 11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both S1 and S2. The purpose of AP Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • To introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface
  • To learn about and employ the methods of geographers, especially including observation, mapmaking, data gathering and reporting, and technical writing
  • To employ spatial concepts, geographic vocabulary, and landscape interpretation to a variety of locations and situations around the globe and in local areas
  • To develop a geographic perspective with which to view the landscape and understand current events
  • Students will be tested throughout the year via multiple-choice, Short-Answer Questions, Long Essays, and Document Based Question essays to prepare them for the A.P. test in May.-All AP Human Geography

If you take this course, you must also take SS680-S2 – AP Human Geography S2

SS700 AP Government & Politics
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program Students will acquire an analytic perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States politics. This course has been designed to help students successfully complete the National College Board Advanced Placement Government and Politics exam (administered in May) which may allow students to earn college credit. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to US government and politics
  • Understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences – including political behavior, principles used to explain or justify various government structures and procedures, and the political effects of these structures and procedures
  • Analyze and interpret basic data relevant to US government and politics including data presented in charts, tables, and other formats
  • Critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately, and develop their connections across the curriculum

Contemporary US History
or
AP US History

If you take this course, you must also take SS700-S2 – AP Government & Politics S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History
SS710 AP European History
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. Accelerated Course College Advanced Program offered in alternate years, this course will be offered in the 2020-2021 school year. The students will analyze basic themes of Modern European Society including intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history. The AP outline will be used as a guide for the course. Units deal with the philosophy and the growth of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in European society. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze the development and evolution of modern European society by exploring three themes: cultural and intellectual history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history
  • Express historical understanding through an essay with a well-developed thesis, relevant topic sentences, supported with specific historical information, and a conclusion
  • Read primary source historical documents to form logical inferences about historical events or movements and discern between varying points of view
  • Use appropriate technology to gather, analyze, apply, and synthesize historical data and information
  • Acquire knowledge of basic events and movements in modern European society

SS200-S1- Contemporary US History S1 AND SS200-S2 – Contemporary US History S2
or
SS720-S1 – AP US History S1 AND SS720-S2 – AP US History S2

If you take this course, you must also take SS710-S2 AP European History S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History before taking AP European History
SS720 AP US History
10, 11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. College Advanced Program This course emphasizes analytical skills, critical thinking, reading, and writing when dealing with the factual knowledge necessary to critically analyze the issues within U.S. History. The A.P outline will be used as a guide for the course. Units include Colonial History, the Revolution and Early Republic, Nationalism and Sectionalism, Civil War and Reconstruction, Growth of Industrialization and Urbanization, World War I and America’s emergence as a world power, Depression and New Deal, World War II, Cold War America, and the Modern U.S. This course is designed to facilitate successful completion of the A.P.U.S. History exam in the spring for potential earning of college credit. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May. Summer readings may be assigned.

Outcomes:

  • Analyze historical facts and interpretations of historians
  • Develop critical analysis skills to clearly communicate ideas in written form
  • Compare and contrast political, geographic, economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual institutions, structures, and processes over time and between different groups within American society
  • Analyze the contributions and effects of past events to the contemporary world
  • Evaluate the diversity of the American populace and subsequent relationships among different groups based on race, class, ethnicity, and gender in American history
  • Identify and evaluate the diverse individual and collective art-based, popular culture expressions
  • Examine trends in trade, commerce, and technology over time
  • Evaluate the effects of capitalist development, labor unions, and consumerism on economic development
  • Examine how American identity is influenced by political, geographic, economic, cultural, and familial institutions
  • Compare and contrast American foreign policy over time
  • Assess the role of American military action from the pre-colonial period to our current time and its impact on foreign policy, politics, the economy, and society

Global Studies
or
AP Human Geography

If you take this course, you must also take SS720-S2 – AP US History S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Global Studies or AP Human Geography before taking AP US History
SS730 AP Psychology
11, 12
Advanced Placement
1

This is a year long course that requires selection of both semesters: S1 and S2. AP Psychology provides a college level introduction to psychology at the secondary level. This course stresses critical thinking, reading, and writing within the context of scientific methodology and questioning. Students are introduced to the major topical areas of psychology by studying core concepts and theories and by learning the basic skills of psychological research. This course has been designed to help students successfully complete the National College Board Advanced Placement Psychology exam, administered in May, which may allow students to earn college credit. The course outline complied by the College Board will be used as a guide for the units taught in class. This course will examine research methods, human psychological and biological development, sensation/perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, developmental psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders, stress, and social psychology. Students signing up for an Advanced Placement course will be expected to take the AP Exam in May.

Outcomes:

  • Develop scientific attitudes and skills including critical thinking, problem solving and an understanding of scientific methodology related to psychology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of psychological concepts, perspectives, theories, terminology and their interconnectedness
  • Develop methods to use psychological knowledge in everyday life
  • Produce clear and coherent writing to answer Free Response Questions
  • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research

Contemporary US History
or
AP US History

If you take this course, you must also take SS730-S2 – AP Psychology S2

It is recommended that students receive a minimum of a C in Contemporary US History or AP US History before taking AP Psychology
TE121 Metals I TC
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

Metals I is a semester course that is designed to give students experience in welding, machining. and metal fabrication. Each area will use a variety of projects to provide students with “hands on” experience.

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
TE161 Intro to Engineering Design TC
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
1

Introduction to Engineering Dersign (IED) is a transcripted yearlong course that Project Lead The Way designed for 9th through 12th grade students. The major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their course work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.

Concurrent Algebra 1 or Geometry

If you take this course, you must also take TE160-S2 – Intro Engineering Design S2

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
TE501 Engineering Design and Development TC
10, 11, 12
College Credit
1

Engineering Design and Development (EDD) is a year long transcripted Project Lead The Way capstone course. Students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel. Students will have access to the FAB Lab, Woods Lab, and Metals Lab. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.

MA200-S1 – Geometry S1 AND MA200-S2 – Geometry S2
AND
SC452-S1 – Principles of Engineering S1 AND SC452-S2 – Principles of Engineering S2

If you take this course, you must also take TE501-S12 – Eng. Design and Dev AS S2

This course utilizes the Comet Creations FAB LAB. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.
TE702 Welding I TC
9, 10, 11, 12
College Credit, Standard
0.5

Welding I is a semester course that is designed to give students insight and practical knowledge of the machining and welding industry. Course experience will also include the study of blueprint analysis (orthographic layout, line styles, symbols, and dimensions). Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in the welding processes of oxy-acetylene, SMAW, GMAW, and GTAW. Students will be involved in the production of parts and projects based on given blueprints. Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.

TE121 – Metals I

Students may receive transcripted credit for this course from Gateway Technical College.